Each year, more than 10 million people world-wide suffer from severe head trauma while 1.5 million of those people are in the U.S. alone.

Infrascan has created an innovative, safe, and noninvasive way to detect brain trauma instantly and at the scene of the accident.  This sturdy handheld, portable device uses near-infrared (NIR) technology to instantly determine if internal bleeding is present in a patient’s head and if immediate use of a CT scan is required.  Successful treatment often depends upon a timely intervention to prevent neurological deterioration.

Brain hematoma detection is vital within the first hour of a cranial trauma. This device could become a standard for emergency medical technicians, first responders, on the field athletes, and also battlefield medics.  Uncontrolled bleeding from the brain can become deadly within a matter of minutes, so an instant assessment of possible intracranial hematomas (more commonly referred to as bleeding on the brain).  For patients who live in rural areas, immediate evaluation of the severity of brain trauma could be essential if the patient requires immediate transport to a hospital with specialized CT equipment.

The FDA has recently approved the use of the Infrascanner Model 2000 for use, which is an upgrade of the previous Model 1000, and is now available to even to the general public.

How it Works

This transportable device functions by emitting infrared light to different areas of the brain.  The absorption of light should be symmetrical throughout the brain unless there is greater local concentration of hemoglobin.  The differential of this light absorption in a particular area of the head leads to an instant estimation of the location and extent of the injury.

Scanning a patient with the device takes about 2-3 minutes. Rapidly and with ease, the Infrascan reforms emergency medical assistance and could save and improve the value of many lives.

Infrascanner 2000 is available for civilians via MedLogic and for U.S. military customers via ADS Medical.

 

[Image via infrascanner]