A new building material invented by Australian company Zeo has every chance to become the next big thing in the industry and a viable alternative to the traditional use of wood, plastics and resins.

Called Zeoform, this new building material is made only of cellulose fibers and water, but it is incredibly strong and can be easily molded into a very wide range of products.

Zeoform: Building with Water and Cellulose

The revolutionary material owes its hardwood like resistance to the process developed and patented by Zeo. The process is entirely non-toxic and does not use any glue, chemicals, binders or any kind of additive.

It is based on a natural process named hydroxyl bonding, by which cellulose fibers stick together in water. And Zeo has found a way to exploit this process so as to convert the resulting cellulose and water mix into a material “as strong as ebony,” as the company says.

Zeo says that Zeoform at higher densities is resistant to water and fire. Moreover, the company is currently developing special coatings that can resist even the most extreme weather conditions.

The Zeoform can be easily molded, sprayed or shaped into many different products, and its versatility makes it very suitable for use in virtually all manufacturing industries that use wood, resins and plastics.

If it goes into mass production, the new building material will bring about significant environmental advantages, mostly because it will eliminate the need of using wood and would reduce the level of pollution associated with the plastic industry.

Moreover, a major advantage is that Zeoform is made of water and cellulose, which is basically the most abundant organic compound on the planet. Cellulose can be extracted from various sources, from the secretion of some bacteria and some algae to plants, fabrics, recycled paper, etc.

zeoform building material

Zeo is planning to launch a crowdfunding campaign for the new material later this month. The company’s website already features  a lot of information about Zeoform, as well as a gallery showcasing uses of the material in areas such as furniture, homeware, musical instruments, jewelry, industrial parts manufacturing and others.

What do you think of the material? What other possible uses do you envisage for Zeoform?

[Images via Zeoform & Zeoafrica]