Not everyone can scuba dive but most people can snorkel. This new device could be about to take snorkelling to the next level. Take a look at the Subwing.

Designed by the Norwegian sailing enthusiast, Simon Sivertsen, Subwing has been created to be towed along by a boat, whilst the person holding on to the two wings can be pulled underwater, performing acrobatics or just enjoying the beautiful view of the undersea world.

The idea came to 20-year old Sivertsen while he was on a sailing trip in the Mediterranean.

Subwing

‘When sailing through the Greek islands, I was astounded by the clarity of the water, it almost felt like flying when diving, just missing the speed and thrill,’ he write on the company’s website.

‘The first ideas of an underwater wing, towed behind a boat, started emerging deep in the right hemisphere of my brain.

Using the world’s strongest rope, Dyneema, Subwing is attached to a boat. The two wings can be individually manouevered, allowing the user to twist them in  order to spin. To attempt a roll, the user twists the wings in opposite directions.

Subwing

The user can reach speeds of up to four knots by holding on to the wings. No other equipment is needed other than a scuba mask, and a big deep breathe of course. Even when the user wants to surface, this is not a problem as tilting the wings upwards results in a resurface.

The company says that normally beginners can spend up to 15 seconds underwater, diving at around 3 metres but this can be increased with training. A number of accessories can also be attached to the wing, like a lighting system for dark dives and a GoPro camera mount for capturing the experience.

The basic Subwing model costs $490, with the option of upgrading to a ‘carbon glossy’ one for $895.

I did wonder whether you could use Subwing along with the Triton scuba mask. Surely that would be the ultimate experience, being pulled along through the water like a dolphin and actually being able to breathe underwater to enjoy it.

[Images via Subwing]

SOURCE: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2546632/