Android Adult Player porn app entices users with explicit images but instead takes photos using smartphone’s front camera, locking the device and then holding users to ransom.

In this latest example of ‘Ransomware,’ the Adult Player app seems  legitimate enough to begin with. Unfortunately this particular porn app for Android soon begins to take selfies in secret. It then locks the device it was accessed on displaying one of the images taken, and demands $500 to unlock the smartphone.

The app also threatens to expose users’ private data and  delete all data on the device.

Adult Player

The Ransomware app was discovered by US based security firm Zscaler in the course of its “daily malware hunt.” The app is activated when users inadvertently give Adult Player full admin rights the first time it is run by clicking on ‘Activate.’ This then allows Adult Player to use a technique commonly referred to as a  “reflection attack,” to modify and examine the smartphone device in question, which might allow the malicious app to avoid detection and analysis by security apps also installed.

Shortly after, the porn app then starts taking photos, and shortly after that the phone is locked and the ransom screen displayed. A hardware reboot does not solve the problem as the app reloads, and the ransom message remains persistent, meaning there is no way for users to uninstall the app in the usual way.

How to remove the Adult Player porn app without paying $500

Fortunately for terrified and embarrassed users, there is an easy solution: ZScaler state the app can be uninstalled by doing the following:

Adult Player removal

How to not be a victim of Ransomware

Only download apps from trusted and verifiable sources such as Google Play. Adult Player is not available from Google Play. By utilising common sense, and thinking with your head, rather than your genitalia you make it hard, (excuse the pun), for malicious ransomware apps to get on your phone in the first place.

Ransomware for Smartphones continues to increase

McAfee Labs stated in their August Threats Report that instances of Ransomware had increased 127% in just one year. While Ransomware has been an issue on PC and desktop environments for some time, its presence on mobile devices is still regarded by many in the industry to be in its infancy.

Part of the reason for the increase smartphone malware according to Raj Samani of Intel, speaking to BBC News, is that “it’s very easy to make…[and]…there are people you can pay to do the work for you…”

Zscaler had previously written a blog post about similar malware for Android devices.