Google has made the announcement that its AdWords is getting a makeover, and has been rebuilt from the ground up, in order to fully accommodate the fact that for most of us, mobile devices are the way we access the World Wide Web.

Essentially, they’ve decided to make a bunch of updates that will make its ad tools more suitable for mobile technology.

The major, or most prominent change, is to see a much greater emphasis on location related mobile searches. The new changes were announced at the Google Performance Summit in San Francisco and followed the news that of the trillions of Google searches every year, over half are now made from mobile devices.

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Google has claimed that searches made from mobile devices are currently growing 50% faster than in any other area, so this new direction makes sense.

Significantly, the move will separate desktop and mobile devices in the way AdWords operates for each type of device.

Advertisers will be given the option to make mobile the primary focus of their campaigns, and also allow them to set different bids for desktop, tablet, and mobile devices.

“Marketers need more control and flexibility to optimize bids on specific devices. In the next few months, you’ll be able to set individual bid adjustments for each device type– mobile, desktop and tablet. This lets you anchor your base keyword bid to the device most valuable to your business and then set bid adjustments for each of the other devices. You will also have a wider range to adjust bids, up to +900%. With more controls, you can now optimize with greater precision while keeping things simple with a single campaign that reaches consumers across devices.”

But this isn’t the only change Google has made.

The way the ads themselves look is changing as well.  Advertisers will now have an increase in headline characters and get one 80 character line description to sell their product instead of the two current 35 character lines.

Google had been considering redesigning the way their AdWords works for some time now, but only recently have felt that the wider world was now ready for the changes.

That said, it has drawn criticism from some quarters for not having separated the distinction between mobile and desktop experiences before now, arguing that some companies were forced to pay more in AdWords fees for click-throughs that could never lead to sales.

The original Blog post can be seen here.