When Google launched the Chromebook Pixel in 2013, few people ran to the stores to see if there was any in stock, in fact I’d wager nobody did. It was an expensive and ludicrous notebook running Chrome OS; Google’s web browser operating system that is capable of running on any computer.

chromebook-pixel

The whole goal of the Chromebook Pixel was odd and typical-Google, to make a huge break into an industry in an almost laughable way. The difference is the Chromebook Pixel did not get any better with age.

Now, Google has announced the second generation Chromebook Pixel – not the Chromebook Pixel 2 – just the Chromebook Pixel.

It features an almost identical build, a full metal design with super-high resolution (2560 x 1700) display. Google has shredded a few pounds from the notebook and trimmed the size down a notch, but nothing major.

The big difference is inside the Chromebook Pixel, it now features a 2.2GHz Intel Core i5 Broadwell processor, 8GB of RAM and 32GB of SSD. There is also the Pixel LS (Ludicrous Speed) that features a 2.4GHz Intel Core i7 Broadwell processor, 16GB of RAM and 64GB of SSD for $200 more.

The price for the Chromebook Pixel is $999, a $200 drop on the original. This brings Google’s notebook into more reasonable territory, although it still has one major flaw: Chrome OS.

No matter how much Google spices up the Chromebook Pixel, it still runs an blown up web browser in operating system form. Sure, Chrome OS has a few games and heavy apps, but it still is incapable of running most of the apps professionals need.

If Google opened up the Chromebook Pixel to Windows or Linux, perhaps it would be a great sell, but right now it is a glorified way to browse Facebook and play light games like Bastion, The Cave and other games capable of running on mobile.