The Mozilla Foundation, the not-for-profit company behind popular web browser Firefox has revealed that it’s doing just fine without Google’s millions. For the longest of times, it often appeared that Mozilla’s fortunes relied on the charitable mood of Google to remain viable. Google were in real terms, practically bankrolling Firefox.

In a recent interview with CNET however, Mozilla’s Denelle Dixon-Thayer said that it no longer relied on Google as its main source of revenue, confidently optimistic that new deals it has negotiated with other search engines will allow Firefox to prosper and thrive in the years to come saying:

“We don’t have a commercial relationship with Google at this point.”

 

The announcement is a far cry from when Google actively sought to be Firefox’s search engine of preference. The advent of Google’s Chrome browser had an unfortunate effect of the company’s fortunes, and was continuously generating headlines about an uncertain future for the small (relatively) internet company.  Google Chrome currently has over 50% of the search engine market, according to StatCounter, and its market monopoly has grown year on year.

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In the last few years however, Mozilla has diversified its portfolio, negotiating separate deals with Baidu, Yamdex, and Yahoo. The deals ensure that Firefox will garner prominence in countries outside the US, such as China, Russia, and the US.

Mozilla is also looking to 2016 with high hopes for future growth. Profits for 2014 were up on 2013, rising from $314 million to $330 million.

Despite the positive tone struck by Mozilla recently, concerns have been raised about the logic employed in striking a deal with Yahoo. Yahoo is struggling to reinvent itself and remain relevant. A recent Wall Street Journal article made special mention of the fact that several top level executives have left, and that the company had no clear strategy or direction for the future.