Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) and Palo Alto Networks announce collaboration for first-ever national cybersecurity badges.

Girl Scouts of the USA are set to become experts who will be capable of taking future cybersecurity challenges head-on, thanks to the first-ever set of National Cybersecurity badges for girls in grades K-12.

Led by a panel of expert cybersecurity advisers, GSUSA and Palo Alto Networks expect to roll out the first in a series of 18 Cybersecurity badges to Girl Scouts throughout the United States during September 2018.

Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) and Palo Alto Networks announce collaboration for first-ever national cybersecurity badges.

So much more than lighting fires with two sticks, GSUSA is a progressive and forward thinking organization.

Security teams of tomorrow

Mark D. McLaughlin, the Chief Executive Officer of Palo Alto Networks, the security firm who helped establish the new badges in conjunction with the Girl Scouts, said: “Our mission to prevent cyber-attacks and restore trust in the digital age is only achievable if we make meaningful investments not just in technology but also in people.

“Our collaboration with Girl Scouts of the USA to develop curriculum for the first-ever national Cybersecurity badges will positively influence the future of our industry by helping build tomorrow’s diverse and innovative team of problem solvers equipped to counter emerging cyber-threats.” 

Forward thinking

The badges make sense of course. Current and future generations will be ever more impacted in their personal and professional lives by technology, and society in general will need the skills of proficient cybersecurity experts to keep children safe on line, prevent bullying, and avoid everything from computer viruses to identity theft.

Perhaps most importantly for the Girl Scout organization, however, is the fact that the cybersecurity badges represent the taking of personal responsibility for their own well-being online, a potential future career, and a valuable 21st century skillset. 

Stop the press

The official press release by the Girl Scouts highlights the fact that the worldwide deficit of qualified cybersecurity professionals will reach 3.5 million by 2021. “A deficit of this magnitude can inhibit the industry’s ability to prevent cyber-breaches, and the challenge is compounded by the growing frequency and sophistication of cyber-attacks. Getting ahead of tomorrow’s threats requires a larger, diverse and innovative team of problem solvers.”

In total there will be 18 new Cybersecurity badges, available for Girl Scouts by September of this year, and Girls Scouts of all ages will be able to explore opportunities in STEM while developing problem-solving and leadership skills.

Girls Scout USA CEO Sylvia Acevedo said, “We recognize that in our increasingly tech-driven world, future generations must possess the skills to navigate the complexities and inherent challenges of the cyber realm. From arming our older girls with the tools to address this reality to helping younger girls protect their identities via Internet safety, the launch of our national Cybersecurity badge initiative represents our advocacy of cyber preparedness―and our partnership with Palo Alto Networks makes a natural fit for our efforts.”

The Girl Scout movement in the USA has 1.8 million girls, and 800,000 adults, and who believe in “the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader™) to change the world”.

Protect yourself

Of course you don’t need a badge to protect you and your family online (although it helps). Why not take a moment and see what free Antivirus and security measures you can download and install, right here on FileHippo.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“Our mission to prevent cyber-attacks and restore trust in the digital age is only achievable if we make meaningful investments not just in technology but also in people.Our collaboration with Girl Scouts of the USA to develop curriculum for the first-ever national Cybersecurity badges will positively influence the future of our industry by helping build tomorrow’s diverse and innovative team of problem solvers equipped to counter emerging cyber-threats,” said Mark D.- McLaughlin, the Chief Executive Officer of Palo Alto Networks, the security firm who helped establish the new badges in conjunction with the Girl Scouts.

Forward thinking

The badges make sense of course. Current and future generations will be ever more impacted in their personal and professional lives by technology, and society in general will need the skills of proficient cybersecurity experts to keep children safe on line, prevent bullying, and avoid everything from computer viruses to identity theft.

Perhaps most importantly for the Girl Scout organization, however, is the fact that the cybersecurity badges represent the taking of personal responsibility for their own well-being online, a potential future career, and a valuable 21st century skillset. 

Stop the press

The official press release by the Girl Scouts highlights the fact that the worldwide deficit of qualified cybersecurity professionals will reach 3.5 million by 2021. “A deficit of this magnitude can inhibit the industry’s ability to prevent cyber-breaches, and the challenge is compounded by the growing frequency and sophistication of cyber-attacks. Getting ahead of tomorrow’s threats requires a larger, diverse and innovative team of problem solvers.”

In total there will be 18 new Cybersecurity badges, available for Girl Scouts by September of this year, and Girls Scouts of all ages will be able to explore opportunities in STEM while developing problem-solving and leadership skills.

Girls Scout USA CEO Sylvia Acevedo said, “We recognize that in our increasingly tech-driven world, future generations must possess the skills to navigate the complexities and inherent challenges of the cyber realm. From arming our older girls with the tools to address this reality to helping younger girls protect their identities via Internet safety, the launch of our national Cybersecurity badge initiative represents our advocacy of cyber preparedness―and our partnership with Palo Alto Networks makes a natural fit for our efforts.”

The Girl Scout movement in the USA has 1.8 million girls, and 800,000 adults, and who believe in “the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world.

Protect yourself

Of course you don’t need a badge to protect you and your family online (although it helps). Why not take a moment and see what free Anti-Virus and security measures you can download and install, right here on FileHippo.com.